Be human, not Soylent

by Jennifer J. Breazeale on November 13, 2009

Stowe_Boyd_At_DefragAfter surviving a morning presentation filled with short-sighted selfishness, aggression, and fear, I eagerly grasped at the kinder, more hopeful society described by Stowe Boyd.*

*Who happens to be the most tweetable speaker I’ve ever heard. I think he actually speaks in 140 character sound bytes.

Instead of taking the trash out of the economy (you know, like librarians. Or teachers.) and driving harder and harder for productivity gains, let’s look at the humans who have those jobs.

Let’s build villages instead of armies, businesses who thrive on a human (and humane) scale, and opportunities for people, individuals, to become a source of meaning and a lens through which to see the world.

Imagine if the people doing the work mattered at least as much as the work itself. What would your relationships, your work, the world look like if you felt the most free, most engaged, and most needed?

Other ideas included:

  • We define ourselves through our relationships with others
  • The rise of the real-time web is making small talk big again. People are listening for the earliest whispers of news, the information that is brand new, and now have many more opportunities to do so.
  • All critical information that is relevant to you is, or will soon be, available. Search tools cannot and will not be sufficient to manage this torrent. Instead, your social connections will act as a filter. Your network will be an engine of meaning.
  • People will continue to trade personal connectivity for connectedness.

For more information check out Stowe’s presentation, “10 Minute Sprint from 140 Characters Conference: Social Business“.

Photo by Graeme Thickins

  • alansmlxl

    Dear Jennifer,

    Thank you for referencing my post. Kind regards

    Alan Moore

  • Anonymous

    Dear Jennifer,

    Thank you for referencing my post. Kind regards

    Alan Moore

  • alansmlxl

    Dear Jennifer,

    Thank you for referencing my post. Kind regards

    Alan Moore

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